Staff Blog

A decisive step ahead?

August 28, 2007 · Posted by staffFerrari
(4)

First of all: Welcome Back! To all of those, like the one writing these lines, who were lucky to get some time to rest and went on holiday, and also all those, who could not leave and had to stay at home… I think there is no better way to meet up again than after the results of the Turkish GP last weekend. A race where Ferrari, and especially Felipe Massa came back to the top after an unfortunate weekend in Hungary. Although it was a race where you could see another problem, underlined by Raikkonen, and of which I want to speak to you about today, to share some post-race thoughts. The problem I am talking about is – well, I have to say it again – overtaking in the race. But first of all it has to be said that the race track at Istanbul is a great track and apart from the well-known corner number 8, it consists of the perfect mix of medium slow sectors (decisively technical) alternated in a very clever way with numerous very fast sections, distinguishing this track. Those who have been following my blog for a while, know that I am not really a fan of modern race tracks, but that I have underlined more than once the necessity to go back to tracks that are a bit more “old style”, where the drivers’ abilities are more important, so that a line can be drawn between those who have really good hands for driving, and those who don’t. Well, after the race in Istanbul I have almost definitely been convinced that the race track plays an important role and that with the aerodynamics of the present cars one has trouble overtaking even at Monza. At this point I ask myself – and I’m doing that deliberately after a breathtaking success so nobody can accuse me of hypocrisy – about the sense of Formula One, where everything is decided in the qualifying or on first metres between the starting line and the start itself? I don’t know what you think, but I would say that there is none! Well done, someone might say; did he notice that just now? Right. On a first glimpse this issue seems to have a really easy solution, but in reality it’s not like that at all. It has to be said that the Federation has been trying to bring back a minimum of human aspects into Formula One for some years now (although without any success so far). So the question that comes up immediately and which I want to pass on to you is relating to the new rules, which will be introduced by the FIA next year. I’m talking for example about the complete elimination of traction control systems, the same junction box for everybody participating and above all, the possibility to buy (and I want to add “finally”) chassis from other teams. Personally I’d say that this is finally a decisive step ahead in the direction of a return to make races much more spectacular. Although I think that there’s still lots left to be done, especially in terms of reducing the so called “aerodynamic factor”, which is the real basis of the problem of the dramatic shortage of overtaking we are witnessing. So, what are your views…..?    
 
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Comments4


  • Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 10:28
    by
    My opinion is that, allowing teams to buy their chassis from other teams is not the best thing that can happen to Formula1. This is simply because, F1 is the pinnacle of motorsport. Teams competing in F1 are expected to display their technical prowess as well. We might think about the less funded independent teams at this point - those who can ill afford in the long run to design and build their own chassis. Well, reducing the electronic gadgets that go into the F1 cars will be a good starting point for reducing the burden on the independent teams. So, I do think that banning TC is a great move. You know, these years, drivers simply stomp their throttle at the exit of a corner safe in the knowledge that TC will keep the rear of the car in control. This means that the acceleration of all the cars out of corners is at their best and hence drivers find it very difficult to get a tow behind the car in front of them. When there is no TC, the drivers will be required to get the balance right between giving maximum throttle input and ensuring that they don't light up their rear tyres. Different drivers over a race distance will adopt different techniques to lauch them out of the corners in the best (read as: quickest) way. This will atleast mean that if the driver behind another car gets his balance better than the one in front, he can get a better acceleration out of the corner and hence can get alongside or get a good tow on the run-down into the next corner. Already, engines've been frozen. I personally donot like this move. But, we've to accept it keeping in mind the drivers' safety. So, in my opinion, chassis sharing is a definite no-no. The FIA simply can't afford to keep freezing every bit technology on F1 cars. There must ample scope for development of the cars. This should be the case if Formula One is to remain the pinnacle of motorsport in the future as well. - - Sriram Sridharan, TN, India
  • Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 10:28
    by
    Cosa ne penso? Penso che sono un po' strano, ma io sono sereno quando le gare sono noiose perchè ammazzate dalla supremazia Ferrari. Per qualche anno ho goduto, adesso è ora di soffrire; elettronica oppure no, cambio con selettore manuale ad "H" o meno, se la Ferrari vince per me è ok! ;-)
  • Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 10:28
    by
    My opinion is that, allowing teams to buy their chassis from others is not the best thing that can happen to Formula1. This is simply because, F1 is the pinnacle of motorsport. Teams competing in F1 are expected to display their technical prowess as well. We might think about the less funded independent teams at this point - those who can ill afford in the long run to design and build their own chassis. Well, reducing the electronic gadgets that go into the F1 cars will be a good starting point for reducing the burden on the independent teams. So, I do think that banning TC is a great move. You know, these years, F1 drivers simply stomp their throttle at the exit of a corner safe in the knowledge that TC will keep the rear of the car in control. This means that the acceleration of all the cars out of corners is at their best and hence drivers find it very difficult to get a tow behind the car in front of them. When there is no TC, the drivers will be required to get the balance right between giving maximum throttle input and ensuring that they don't light up their rear tyres. Different drivers over a race distance will adopt different techniques to lauch them out of the corners in the best (read as: quickest) way. This will atleast mean that if the driver behind another car gets his balance better than one in front, he can get a better acceleration out of the corner and hence can get alongside or get a good tow on the run-down into the next corner. Already, engines've been frozen. I personally donot like this move. But, we've to accept it keeping in mind the drivers' safety. So, in my opinion, chassis sharing is a definite no-no. F1 simply can't afford to keep freezing everything on F1 cars. There must ample scope for development if the cars. This should be the case if Formula One is to remain the pinnacle of motorsport.
  • Tuesday, 24 Feb 2009 10:28
    by
    I`ve muttered on about the lack of overtaking for years - &, as you say, passing now seems virtually impossible at even the good old tracks. The split rear wing idea appears to have proved useless but I`m hopeful the Overtaking Working Group will finally come up with an answer to get overtaking back into the sport. The standard ECU (which I read there are big problems with) may, therefore, be a complete non-starter (apologies for the appalling pun). I don`t really believe in any form of standardisation in F1. For me, standardisation is against the very principles of innovation & "cutting edge" that Formula 1 has always been about. That`s also why, along with possible safety issues, I`m not sure TC should be banned. Customer cars - I`m struggling to remember but wasn`t that how Frank Williams started?

 

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